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Introduction to Mediation: Part II

Research indicates that the successful adjustment of children during times of family-related stress is directly related to two factors:

 

  • the level of cooperation between parents
  • the continued involvement of both parents in their lives

 

Mediation, therefore, encourages participants to see themselves as the co-parents who share in the responsibility of their children’s future care.

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Posted by on February 21, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 5

Tips for Success

 Your participation and cooperation throughout the CRC process is essential.

We know that the process may be a stressful and emotional one. However, it is helpful to listen to what everyone has to say and to share your opinions and concerns in a way that shows respect for everyone in the process.

 

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 1

Introduction

The Conflict Resolution Conference (CRC) is a confidential service that helps parents solve parenting issues in a cooperative and positive manner. In this process, the parents are able to keep their decision-making roles in solving family disputes with the assistance of a Family Relations Counselor (FRC). Attorneys of record may be included in the meetings and relevant information from community resources/agencies involved with the family will be made part of the process.

It is important that parents work together to make joint decisions for their children’s care and development. The CRC supports this process by guiding and educating the parents. This usually results in a parenting plan that is successful and less stressful for all involved.

The main issues dealt with in this process are child custody and/or access arrangements. However, if the parents and the attorneys agree, some financial and property issues may also be addressed.

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 5

The final conference is when the FRC will share relevant information gathered during the IFE, present an assessment of the referred issue, and provide a recommended plan to resolve the matter. A written report summarizing the information shared in the final conference will also be handed out in this meeting and given to the Court.

 

If this information and report does not help the parents come to an agreement, the matter will most likely go to trial. At that time, the FRC’s recommendations and report may be used as evidence and the counselor may testify.

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 4

During the course of the IFE, the counselor may schedule additional individual appointments with one or both of the parents. Arrangements may also be made to meet with the children at one or both of the parents’ homes and/or the Family Services Office. This part of the evaluation process will be decided by the FRC based on the issue that was referred.

At the time the counselor’s work in the IFE in done, a final conference will be held with the parents and the attorneys/GALs in the case. When it is not possible to meet together, other arrangements will be made.

 

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 3

The FRC’s role in this process is to explore and assess the concerns of each parent and to make recommendations about a parenting plan that will benefit the children. To do this, the FRC will gather information from both parents and contact professionals involved with the family (such as teachers, doctors, therapists, and others) The IFE is not confidential, which means that this information will be shared with the parents, the attorneys, and Guardians Ad Litem (GAL) involved in the matter, and the Court.

 

So that information can be shared between the professional providers and Family Services, Authorization for Release of Information forms must be signed. If either party has copies of records/reports they may also submitted to the FRC. However, the person who wrote the record/report must be available to the FRC during the evaluation process to answer any questions the FRC may have about the report/record.

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Custodial Parent FAQs: Part 9

Q: Can the amount of my child support order be changed?

 

A: Yes, the court can change your order. SES has a process called “review and adjustment” which can assist you in getting your case before the court. SES will accept either a written or verbal request asking for a review of your order and we will start the review process. You may also hire an attorney or go to court on your own (self-represented).

 

 

Q: How does the ‘review and adjustment’ process work?

 

A: Upon receipt of your request, SES will mail you some forms to verify your income information. Complete and return the paperwork and we will start the review. Using the Connecticut Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines and both parties’ income, we will calculate a support amount. If your order is more than 15% different from our calculations, we will begin court action to change your order. Also, in limited situations, SES can help change orders if there has been a substantial change in circumstances since your order was set.

 
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Posted by on January 25, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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