RSS

Tag Archives: custody

Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 6

It is necessary that you make a commitment to cooperate with the Family Services Office in the following ways:

 

1. Keep scheduled appointments and arrive on time for all meetings.

2. Remain open to new suggestions and ideas.

3. Sign the necessary Authorization for Release of Information forms and bring all requested information to your appointments.

4. Do not bring children with you to the Conflict Resolution Conference.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 13, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 3

One role of the FRC is to provide a neutral, supportive, and structured place for discussions to occur. The counselor helps to keep the focus of the meetings on the best interests of the children while allowing the needs and desires of the parents to be considered. The FRC may also provide education about alternative parenting plans and how they are impacted by the stages of child development.

 

It is also possible that the FRC will consider information received from other resources, in an attempt to help the parents resolve their differences. While the parents keep their roles as the decision-makers in this process, the FRC may offer their verbal assessment of the situation and ultimately share recommendations they believe will resolve the issues. These assessments and recommendations are not reported to the Court.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 6

What Parents Need to Do

The participation and cooperation of the parents throughout the Issue Focused Evaluation process is essential. It is very important that a commitment be made to cooperate with the Family Services in the following ways:

1. Keep scheduled appointments and arrive on time for all meetings.

2. Do not bring your children to appointments that are scheduled for you.

3. Fill out the Issue Focused Evaluation Questionnaire completely and accurately before the first appointment and bring it with you to the first appointment.

4. Sign the necessary Authorization for Release of Information forms and bring all requested information to appointments.

5. Make the children available, both at home and at the Family Services Office, if requested by the FRC.

6. If your children are going to be interviewed, explain to them that the FRC wants to meet them, but let them know that they will not be asked to choose between their parents.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 4, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 5

The final conference is when the FRC will share relevant information gathered during the IFE, present an assessment of the referred issue, and provide a recommended plan to resolve the matter. A written report summarizing the information shared in the final conference will also be handed out in this meeting and given to the Court.

 

If this information and report does not help the parents come to an agreement, the matter will most likely go to trial. At that time, the FRC’s recommendations and report may be used as evidence and the counselor may testify.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 3

The FRC’s role in this process is to explore and assess the concerns of each parent and to make recommendations about a parenting plan that will benefit the children. To do this, the FRC will gather information from both parents and contact professionals involved with the family (such as teachers, doctors, therapists, and others) The IFE is not confidential, which means that this information will be shared with the parents, the attorneys, and Guardians Ad Litem (GAL) involved in the matter, and the Court.

 

So that information can be shared between the professional providers and Family Services, Authorization for Release of Information forms must be signed. If either party has copies of records/reports they may also submitted to the FRC. However, the person who wrote the record/report must be available to the FRC during the evaluation process to answer any questions the FRC may have about the report/record.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 30, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Custodial Parent FAQs: Part 8

Q: What should I do if I receive a payment directly from the noncustodial parent?

 

A: All child support payments must be made through the State Disbursement Unit. However, if you do receive a child support payment directly from the noncustodial parent, please mail or fax a signed statement to SES telling us who you received the money from, the amount received and the date of receipt. This information will be used to update the payment records in your case.

 

 

Q: Who do I contact to get more information about my child support payments?

 

A: The fastest and easiest way to get payment information is to call the Child Support Information Line at 1-888-233-7223. The Information Line provides information about when a payment was made, the amount and when your payment was processed.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 24, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Custodial Parent FAQs: Part 7

Q: Does a second family affect a child support order?

A: When a child support order is established, a noncustodial parent’s second family will be reflected in the support calculation. However, once the child support order has been established, a second family is not considered a valid reason to modify the support order for the first family.

 

Q: Will SES help collect any amounts owed after my current support ends?

A: Yes. SES will continue to enforce the order to collect any amounts that are owed.

 

Q: When does the child support order end?

A: In general, the duty to support created by a child support order ends when the child reaches the age of 18. However, this general rule may vary from state to state. For example, in Connecticut, the duty to support may extend to age 19 if the child is still in high school. Please contact SES for a more accurate determination about the duration of your child’s support order.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 23, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,