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Introduction to Mediation: Part II

Research indicates that the successful adjustment of children during times of family-related stress is directly related to two factors:

 

  • the level of cooperation between parents
  • the continued involvement of both parents in their lives

 

Mediation, therefore, encourages participants to see themselves as the co-parents who share in the responsibility of their children’s future care.

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Posted by on February 21, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 5

Tips for Success

 Your participation and cooperation throughout the CRC process is essential.

We know that the process may be a stressful and emotional one. However, it is helpful to listen to what everyone has to say and to share your opinions and concerns in a way that shows respect for everyone in the process.

 

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 4

If the parents reach an agreement during the CRC, the terms of that agreement are reported to the Court, the parents, and the attorneys of record. The agreement becomes legally binding upon order of the Court.

Even when an agreement is not reached during the sessions, the CRC process is still helpful. Parents often leave with a greater understanding of different parenting plans and how they might meet the needs of their children.

Parenting plans may need to change several times over the years for a variety of reasons. If parents need help in resolving issues about their children after the CRC process is completed, they may contact the Court Support Services Division – Family Services for direction.

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 3

One role of the FRC is to provide a neutral, supportive, and structured place for discussions to occur. The counselor helps to keep the focus of the meetings on the best interests of the children while allowing the needs and desires of the parents to be considered. The FRC may also provide education about alternative parenting plans and how they are impacted by the stages of child development.

 

It is also possible that the FRC will consider information received from other resources, in an attempt to help the parents resolve their differences. While the parents keep their roles as the decision-makers in this process, the FRC may offer their verbal assessment of the situation and ultimately share recommendations they believe will resolve the issues. These assessments and recommendations are not reported to the Court.

 
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Posted by on February 7, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Conflict Resolution Conference: Part 1

Introduction

The Conflict Resolution Conference (CRC) is a confidential service that helps parents solve parenting issues in a cooperative and positive manner. In this process, the parents are able to keep their decision-making roles in solving family disputes with the assistance of a Family Relations Counselor (FRC). Attorneys of record may be included in the meetings and relevant information from community resources/agencies involved with the family will be made part of the process.

It is important that parents work together to make joint decisions for their children’s care and development. The CRC supports this process by guiding and educating the parents. This usually results in a parenting plan that is successful and less stressful for all involved.

The main issues dealt with in this process are child custody and/or access arrangements. However, if the parents and the attorneys agree, some financial and property issues may also be addressed.

 
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Posted by on February 5, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 5

The final conference is when the FRC will share relevant information gathered during the IFE, present an assessment of the referred issue, and provide a recommended plan to resolve the matter. A written report summarizing the information shared in the final conference will also be handed out in this meeting and given to the Court.

 

If this information and report does not help the parents come to an agreement, the matter will most likely go to trial. At that time, the FRC’s recommendations and report may be used as evidence and the counselor may testify.

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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Family Services Issue Focused Evaluations: Part 4

During the course of the IFE, the counselor may schedule additional individual appointments with one or both of the parents. Arrangements may also be made to meet with the children at one or both of the parents’ homes and/or the Family Services Office. This part of the evaluation process will be decided by the FRC based on the issue that was referred.

At the time the counselor’s work in the IFE in done, a final conference will be held with the parents and the attorneys/GALs in the case. When it is not possible to meet together, other arrangements will be made.

 

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

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